Does Dylan Matter?: Richard F. Thomas’ Why Dylan Matters reflects on the literary importance of Dylan Richard F. Thomas’ Why Dylan Matters reflects on the literary importance of Dylan

The title Why Dylan Matters, professor Richard F. Thomas’ recent contribution to the ever-expanding field of Dylanology, is perhaps a bit of a misnomer. Thomas is a classicist who teaches a Harvard course on the relationship between Bob Dylan and … Continue reading Does Dylan Matter?: Richard F. Thomas’ Why Dylan Matters reflects on the literary importance of Dylan Richard F. Thomas’ Why Dylan Matters reflects on the literary importance of Dylan

A Dog, a Human Hand and the Survivor: “The Vanishing Season” by Joanna Schaffhausen Joanna Schaffhausen’s debut is undeniably gripping but at times predictable because of its two-dimensional characters.

●●●○○ The Vanishing Season is Joanna Schaffhausen’s debut novel, published December 5th, by HarperCollins. The novel recounts the story of Ellery Hathaway, a police officer in a sleepy town that is jolted to life. For the past three years, peculiarly … Continue reading A Dog, a Human Hand and the Survivor: “The Vanishing Season” by Joanna Schaffhausen Joanna Schaffhausen’s debut is undeniably gripping but at times predictable because of its two-dimensional characters.

Celebrating the life and achievements of Jonathan Swift, 350 years later. Three of Trinity’s experts shed light on their own relationships with one of our best-known alumni, and on why he still looms so large as a literary figure, 350 years after his birth.

October 30th was the 350th birthday of Jonathan Swift; writer, satirist, poet, and one of Trinity’s most illustrious alumni. Swift350 is being celebrated across Dublin this year. Author of works such as Gulliver’s Travels, A Modest Proposal and A Tale … Continue reading Celebrating the life and achievements of Jonathan Swift, 350 years later. Three of Trinity’s experts shed light on their own relationships with one of our best-known alumni, and on why he still looms so large as a literary figure, 350 years after his birth.

The Rooster Bar by John Grisham The Rooster Bar is equally reliable and refreshing, providing exciting thrills without forgoing consistency of style.

John Grisham’s latest offering, The Rooster Bar perfectly encapsulates his desire to let his writing evolve and keep his content current, never letting his high standards falter. Fans, new and returning, will be  treated to a classic Grisham legal thriller … Continue reading The Rooster Bar by John Grisham The Rooster Bar is equally reliable and refreshing, providing exciting thrills without forgoing consistency of style.

Fairytales with a haunting twist: “The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night” Jen Campbell swaps the horse and carriage for broken hearts and murder in her new collection of short stories.

●●●●● The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night, a collection of short stories by Jen Campbell, has recently been published by Two Road Books. This collection focuses on the conventions of the fairytale and turns it … Continue reading Fairytales with a haunting twist: “The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night” Jen Campbell swaps the horse and carriage for broken hearts and murder in her new collection of short stories.

Dust, Daemons and Dark Materials: Philip Pullman’s “The Book of Dust: La Belle Sauvage” Pullman’s long awaited return to the universe of "His Dark Materials" makes a worthy addition to this reader’s bookshelf.

●●●●○ It has been 22 years since Philip Pullman set pen to paper and created the first novel in his seminal trilogy His Dark Materials. In that space of time, we have had a movie adaptation with Daniel Craig and … Continue reading Dust, Daemons and Dark Materials: Philip Pullman’s “The Book of Dust: La Belle Sauvage” Pullman’s long awaited return to the universe of “His Dark Materials” makes a worthy addition to this reader’s bookshelf.

True novel or veiled autobiography? “First Person” by Richard Flanagan Flanagan’s new book is undoubtedly clever, but nevertheless leaves the reader with more questions than certainties.

  ●●●○○   Its first pages seem to announce a novel of formation: Kif, a youthful and destitute father of one and wannabe-writer begins to ghostwrite the memoir of Australia’s most-wanted swindler, in order to pay back his mortgage and … Continue reading True novel or veiled autobiography? “First Person” by Richard Flanagan Flanagan’s new book is undoubtedly clever, but nevertheless leaves the reader with more questions than certainties.

“It Only Happens in the Movies” – review The novel is Bourne’s most obvious feminist critique yet, though it lacks some of the humour and warm friendships that made the 'Spinster Club' series bearable.

●●●○○ Holly Bourne has come a long way from her semi-supernatural debut Soulmates, which presupposed the existence of its titular phenomenon and had a secret international organisation apparently prepared to expend resources and time keeping two teenagers apart simply because … Continue reading “It Only Happens in the Movies” – review The novel is Bourne’s most obvious feminist critique yet, though it lacks some of the humour and warm friendships that made the ‘Spinster Club’ series bearable.

Turtles All The Way… Up? John Green climbs bestseller list with long-awaited new novel Turtles All the Way Down.

●●●●○ If you don’t know what a tuatara is or have never come across the abundance of Star Wars fan fiction available online, then reading John Green’s new book, Turtles All the Way Down, will soon teach you. Though the … Continue reading Turtles All The Way… Up? John Green climbs bestseller list with long-awaited new novel Turtles All the Way Down.

We’re Reading Rupi Kaur’s “the sun and her flowers” Sarah Upton reviews the newest collection by everyone’s favourite Instapoet.

●●●○○ Rupi Kaur’s highly anticipated new collection, the sun and her flowers (2017), was published by Simon & Schuster at the beginning of the month. Kaur documents, in characteristically sparse free verse, journeys of wilting, falling, rooting, rising and blooming. … Continue reading We’re Reading Rupi Kaur’s “the sun and her flowers” Sarah Upton reviews the newest collection by everyone’s favourite Instapoet.

Alternative Fairytales: “The Language Of Thorns” Sorcha May Judge delves into the newest YA offering from Leigh Bardugo.

●●●●○ The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic (2017) is a collection of tales set in the Grishaverse, the fantasy world of Leigh Bardugo’s novels. The fairytales are charmingly intertwined with Sara Kipin’s intricate illustrations, which makes the … Continue reading Alternative Fairytales: “The Language Of Thorns” Sorcha May Judge delves into the newest YA offering from Leigh Bardugo.